Dandelions on pancakes

The Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale, Weber, T. Densleonis, Desf; Leontodon taraxacum, Linn.), though not occurring in the Southern Hemisphere, is at home in all parts of the north temperate zone, in pastures, meadows and on waste ground, and is so plentiful that farmers everywhere find it a troublesome weed, for though its flowers are more conspicuous in the earlier months of the summer, it may be found in bloom, and consequently also prolifically dispersing its seeds, almost throughout the year.  ---Description---From its thick tap root, dark brown, almost black on the outside though white and milky within, the long jagged leaves rise directly, radiating from it to form a rosette Iying close upon the ground, each leaf being grooved and constructed so that all the rain falling on it is conducted straight to the centre of the rosette and thus to the root which is, therefore, always kept well watered. The maximum amount of water is in this manner directed towards the proper region for utilization by the root, which but for this arrangement would not obtain sufficient moisture, the leaves being spread too close to the ground for the water to penetrate.  The leaves are shiny and without hairs, the margin of each leaf cut into great jagged teeth, either upright or pointing somewhat backwards, and these teeth are themselves cut here and there into lesser teeth. It is this somewhat fanciful resemblance to the canine teeth of a lion that (it is generally assumed) gives the plant its most familiar name of Dandelion, which is a corruption of the French Dent de Lion, an equivalent of this name being found not only in its former specific Latin name Dens leonis and in the Greek name for the genus to which Linnaeus assigned it, Leontodon, but also in nearly all the languages of Europe.

So I came across this image in my pancake the other day and wanted to share this with you all since it’s been so long. From my standpoint, it looks like a Dandelion.

Compare the two:

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So there, it’s a dandelion on my pancake. The only difference is that I cannot blow away the little pieces. Ever do that when you were younger? Maybe even now? Still a fun pastime.

Pancake Photos: The Comet

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It’s the first thing I saw when I flipped this one over: A comet. If I step back and really look at it, you can see it’s solid surface, followed by it’s tail.  It looks similar to the description given on the NASA site in regards to a comet’s nucleus.

Well, at least I thought it did.

Anyway, sorry for the absence again.  Internet is off at the house for the moment but I’ll be back up soon with more great images! Until then, enjoy! They’ll be coming in sporadically as I’m able to get to a hotspot to upload them.

 

Pancake Photos Of Expression: Happy Face

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Pancake Photos Of Expression: Bight Eyes, Big Smile

Boston Marathon Explosions, North Korea, and anything else that can put a pain in your heart: Sometimes it takes a lot to smile. However, we cannot allow anyone to take that smile from us. Therefore we smile either on the outside, or on the inside. Still, through everything we go through in this game we call life, we must look for the smile. I found it this morning.

Never let anything take your happiness, no matter what. Give that up you’ll live in fear and loathing in everything else you do.

Pancake Photos: The Serpent Circle

Pancake Photos: This morning I saw something very interesting. Look at this pancake photo from the left and then go counterclockwise and you’ll see the serpent circle.  At this point you should be able to identify its beak, it’s eye, and where the tail ends.  I’ve compared it to seeing something like this once upon a time in a pawn shop:

An odd similarity? Probably so – For the record I’ve seen this named a variety of things, so if it’s not called “The Serpent Circle” forgive me. Like John of Patmos, I’m only trying to describe what I see 🙂  Enjoy and have a great weekend!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Churh On The Hill

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The Churh On The Hill

In order to truly appreciate this piece, look at the center and then look down. You will notice the immediate shape of a church steeple, followed with a light halo in its background. Let your eyes gaze further down and you can see the hill.